2019: Week 5

Welcome to week 5! Although the seasons vary from year to year, week 5 is almost always the introduction of “solid food” (as opposed to baby greens and roots). So welcome to the club, zucchini and summer squash! This is the first of a lot to come, and right behind it will be cucumbers, followed by eggplant, peppers, and tomatoes in July. While we just started picking zucchini within the last week, there are already four successions of it out in the field, and our fifth will go in the ground this week. Over the last decade of farming we’ve tried to pinpoint the correct timing for succession plantings for many crops: zucchini (8-10 rounds), lettuce (15 rounds), tomatoes (5 rounds), baby greens (about 20 rounds) in an effort of have a constant supply of new, fresh, healthy plants and fruits, without being buried by excessive abundance at any given time. We’ve gotten better at it, but this is hard to do. There are good and bad years for each of our crops (due to threats like pests, disease, and weed pressure) and generally good and poor growing years because of weather conditions. Since so many variables are out of our control and every season, from weather to new food trends and evolving customer demand, we pay close attention and try to pivot as best we can in the moment, while always making notes for how we can improve in the next season based on what our members like and how our good our field timing is.

But for now, we’re loving living in the moment of this herbaceous box! (I was just in the box-packing room and the combination of basil, cilantro, and leeks smells incredible!) We hope you enjoy!

This week’s box:

  • Zucchini/Summer Squash

  • Leeks

  • Swiss Chard

  • Cilantro

  • Basil

  • Mizuna (Asian salad and saute green)

  • Bok Choy

  • Choose between our Spicy Salad (our house mesclun mix) or Baby Lettuce

  • Romaine Lettuce

Optional Items:

  • Spinach

  • Garlic Scapes

  • Kohlrabi

  • Kale

  • Pea shoots with beautiful edible pea flowers

This week’s cheese share: Mozzarella from Villa Italian Specialties

This week’s bread share: Sourdough from Carissa’s Bakery

Recipes:
Summer squash, spinach, and leek gratin (try with any cooking green!)

Spicy Cavatelli with leeks and zucchini

Simple mizuna salad

Swiss chard with garlic and basil (use garlic scapes instead of cured garlic!)

Stir-Fried Bok Choy and Mizuna

2019: Week 4

Week 4! We know, it has been a LOT of greens so far because that’s what thrives in our cool wet springs on the east end. As farmers we try to appreciate the abundance a given season brings while we’re immersed in it, so most of our own meals have revolved around the very items that have been in your boxes each week. If you’re not typically a greens eater and are struggling to get through these few boxes, hopefully you’ve at least tried a few new flavors that were unfamiliar to you. And it goes without saying that leafy greens are some of the healthiest, most vitamin-packed foods you can eat! Scroll down for our farmer-tested and approved suggestions for how to get your daily doses of greens! (And zucchini and more “summer season food” is coming soon!)

This week’s most exciting new arrival is the glorious garlic scape. It’s the springy, bouncy, twirly bunch in your box and it’s exciting for a few reasons: they’re delicious (like regular garlic but milder); they only come this time of year AND they signal that the “real” garlic (full heads) is on its way soon. We plant garlic around Halloween each year; the garlic seeds we plant are actually individual cloves, planted a couple inches deep into the soil where they over winter until they sprout up in February or March. By this time of year the garlic is thigh-high and sending out a single flower shoot, the scape. If left to flower, the yellow-ish nodule on the end of each scape will bloom into a white flower that resembles a chive blossom (same plant family) and drop hundreds of the tiniest garlic cloves (about the size of a grain of rice). Instead of letting the flowering part of the plant mature, we snap it off to redirect the plant’s energy into producing a larger head, or bulb, underground. It’s a long process, since it takes nearly nine months to harvest a mature head, but also relatively low-input as there are only a few intensive steps we have to do over the course of the plant’s life: (1) break apart the heads into individual cloves for planting; (2) plant; (3) mulch (garlic does not compete well with weeds, it’s very important to keep it weed-free); (4) harvest the scapes; (5) then harvest the heads! “Easy!” As a fun fact: not all garlic produces scapes, the variety we grow is called “hardneck” and is distinct from most conventionally grown garlic you’d find in the grocery store, which is “softneck.” We love hardneck garlic because scapes are a great byproduct, and hardneck garlic also produces fairly uniform large cloves that are a pleasure to use in the kitchen (softneck garlic heads have many more cloves per head, varying greatly in size). Another fun fact: farmers used to compost their scapes because there was no market for them, but in the last few decades they have become a seasonal delicacy that people really look forward to. And now you’re part of that club! We’ll talk more about garlic when we start the harvest, which will be around 4th of July.

This week’s box:

  • Green Curly Kale

  • Mizuna (Asian salad and saute green)

  • Dandelion Greens (did you try that dandelion Ceasar salad recipe??)

  • Butter Head Lettuce

  • Baby Lettuce

  • Baby Arugula

  • Kohlrabi

  • Radishes (variety called Cincinnati Market Radish - looks like a carrot! Great for dipping)

  • Garlic Scapes (woohoo! chop up and use like you would regular garlic, or grill them whole and they have a similar texture to skinny asparagus, but garlicy of course. Or, make garlic scape pesto!)

Optional Items:

  • Fennel

  • Beets

  • Head Lettuce

  • Kale

  • Broccoli Raab

Recipes (Farmer suggestions for eating all your greens! These are all fast and easy, because we’re pretty tired and don’t have a lot of time or energy to cook at the end of the day):

Salads: don’t have to be boring!

  • Make meal salads with greens as your base, add your favorite toppings and a salad can be so satisfying (my go-to salad the last couple weeks has been arugula, avocado, apple, Gorgonzola, and vinaigrette). A huge salad and toast are one of my favorite lunches/dinners.

  • Add a salad at breakfast! If you’re a savory breakfast lover (like me…) and you’re enjoying eggs/toast, you might be surprised how much you love a little side salad with a light/sharp vinaigrette to fill out the meal!

On the grill: In the summer we grill many times per week, and I always grill something green while the grill is going. The greens take on the smokey charred flavor of the grill, and add great color to any dish of grilled meats or fish. Grilling greens is arguably the easiest way to prepare greens because there is very little knife-prep involved, here’s how I prep each of the greens below (all are coated in olive oil, salt, and pepper prior to grilling)

  • Kale: remove the rubber band, rinse, coat in evoo, salt and pepper, toss right on the grill turning regularly. If you leave them til they’re crispy you can eat them like long chips, no silverware needed!

  • Bok Choy and Napa Cabbage: Cut lenghwise into halves or quarters, depending on the size. Flip them every minute or so until browned to your liking!

  • Kohlrabi: not truly a green…but slice into rounds and throw them on! The greens are edible too, you can treat them like kale.

Saute (everybody in: the one-pot-wonder): Toss chopped greens into a pot with garlic and olive oil and cook them all together. Add the heartiest greens first (usually kale) and as they cook down add the more delicate items (mizuna would be added last in this week’s box). You can also cube the kohlrabi and have that be involved in your greens medley to add some great texture (kohlrabi should get a few-minute head-start on the greens if cooking them all together). This huge pot of greens can be incorporated into:

  • A pasta dish

  • Taco/quesadilla filling

  • On its own with an egg on top and used throughout the week (a great way to eat greens every day - no excuse, they are already cooked and waiting for you in the fridge.

Bed of greens under meat or fish: If you’re roasting any meat or fish in the oven, laying the meat on a bed of greens is great because the greens will absorb the delicious juices from whatever you’re cooking.

Pesto: We usually think of pesto as a basil-driven delight, but almost any leafy green can be made into pesto (lettuce would be weird, so that’s an exception). A quick google of any green in your box will reveal a world of ways to turn your bunched greens into a savory dip/side for chips, crackers, chopped veggies, or a sandwich or pasta topper!. (arugula and kale pesto are some of our best sellers!)

Juicing: Admittedly, juicing is not necessarily my thing, but if it’s your thing, I don’t have to tell you how many greens you can get through by drinking them! I do own a fancy blender, and I do love smoothies, so that’s where this method comes into play for me. It’s very easy to add the sweeter greens (kale, spinach, mizuna) to any smoothie and they really blend right into the background of your smoothie base.

Do you have other ways you love to eat greens? Let us know and we’ll share: CSA@AmberWavesFarm.org

This week’s bread share: Salty Soured Pickled Rye from Carissa’s Breads

This week’s cheese share: Choice between “Summer Dance” and “Peconic Bell” from Catapano Goat Dairy

2019: Week 3

Week 3 already! This week’s box is another celebration of greens for salads, stir-fries, pestos, and green juices. We think this may also be the first time in CSA history that all three members of the “goosefoot” plant family that we grow on the farm are in the box in the same week (chard, spinach, baby beets). As farmers we think a lot about plant families for crop rotations, plant care, spacing and timing, and pest and disease pressure in the fields, but unless you have an allergy to a specific family, as an eater the concept of plant families may be new to you. The goosefoots (feet?) are a much smaller family than some of the others we grow (brassicas or cruciferous include: broccoli, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, radishes, arugula, and so many more; nightshades or solanaceous include: peppers, eggplant, tomatoes, potatoes, but NOT sweet potatoes!) For fun we’ve listed the plant families next to each of the items in this week’s box, hopefully you find some new fun facts for the day!

The luscious greens (of all families) in the box have been loving the weather over the last week, and really shot up over those few warm sunny days we finally had. While we’re harvesting lots of greens these days, we’ve discovered on our field walks that the first of the baby zucchinis are forming, the cucumbers are coming along, and while the tomatoes are at least a month a way the plants in our earliest planting are flowering and looking great (pruning those tomatoes is on our long to do list for this week…) wish us luck with it all and we’ll see you next week!

This week’s box:

  • Bagged Baby Salad Greens (mix of brassica family)

  • Head Lettuce (Asteraceae family; fun fact: same family as artichokes and sunflowers!)

  • Baby Beets (goosefoot family)

  • Napa Cabbage (brassica family; combine with the scallions and kohlrabi for kimchi, or slice lengthwise in half or quarters, lightly coat in olive oil, salt, and pepper, and throw it on the grill (that’s Amanda’s favorite way to enjoy Napa cabbage and kale…))

  • Pea Shoots (legume family; have you made pea shoot pesto yet??)

  • Scallions (allium family)

  • Kohlrabi (brassica family; chop up and cook the leaves, too)

  • Swiss Chard (goosefoot family; chop up and quickly steam or sauté like spinach)

  • Spinach (goosefoot family)

Optional on the side:

  • Kale (brassica family)

  • Pea Shoots (legume family)

  • Mint (Labiatae family; add it to a cocktail, you deserve it!)

  • Edible Flowers (brassica family; taste like sweet broccoli, sprinkle on salads or use as a garnish for meats, a veggie dish, or beautiful cocktail)

Bread Share: Carissa’s Honey Oat

Cheese Share: a selection of New York Cheeses

Recipes:

2019: Week 2

This week’s box:

  • Bagged Baby Salad Greens

  • Head Lettuce

  • Italian Kale

  • Bok Choy

  • Pea Shoots

  • Radishes

  • Kohlrabi (chop up and cook the leaves, too)

  • Chives

Optional on the side:

  • Radishes

  • Dandelion Greens

  • Kale

  • Edible Flowers

Bread Share: Carissa’s Sourdough

Cheese Share: Fresh Mozzarella

Recipes:

2019: Week 1

Hello and welcome back to our eleventh season at Amber Waves Farm and our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program! You have made a great choice to join us at our farm where you have the unique experience of enjoying a freshly picked box of seasonal veggies  each week as well as access to our fields and member perks (including a discount at our market). We rely on you, our members, to commit to spending the season with us so we know how much to grow and so we can afford to buy seeds and equipment and start paying our farm crew early in the season, months before we have anything to harvest. There are many ways to get your hands on fresh, organic, high quality produce these days. The availability of home-delivery has exploded since we started the farm in 2009, and for people who otherwise don’t have time or access to getting themselves to a farm regularly, these services are such a great option. You (and we farmers!) are so fortunate to be able to walk right out to the field to see where our food is coming from and experience that process hands-on. We encourage you to walk around the farm and take note of how it changes as the season progresses. We feel incredibly fortunate to have the opportunity to do what we love every day at the farm, and we are so excited to share our food and space with you, our members.

Each season as we approach opening day, which used to mean the first CSA pick up or our first annual trip to the Montauk Farmers Market with just Katie and me, and now also means re-opening our market and kitchen with a much larger team, it’s impossible not for us not to be awe-struck by how far the farm has come since 2009. Thanks to our CSA members, board members, donors, friends, customers, apprentices, fantastic, hard-working employees, and our drive for the farm to survive, we have arrived at a place where we believe the farm can be sustainable. The farm has land-security in property-ownership of our home-base field, and operating the market will eventually largely fund our educational programming in-house. We are grateful for the decade behind us and excited for the one ahead. Thank you for your interest in being a part of the farm, we couldn’t do this without you! We’ll share more about the farm, our history, and what we’re working towards as the season goes on, and please don’t hesitate to ask us questions!

Okay, now for the box! As you returning members know, spring is a time of lots of greens! These first few boxes before the “solid food” (cucumbers and zucchini to start, tomatoes and eggplant in July, etc.) is ready can be thought of as a detox-box after a winter of…maybe not such fresh food! This cool wet spring (are we even farmers if we don’t talk about the weather?) has not been the most ideal for growing in general, but the greens are looking good to start!

This week’s box:

  • Baby Greens (2 bags)

  • Radishes

  • Broccoli Raab

  • Baby Head Lettuce

  • Bok Choy (chop up and saute/stir fry!)

  • Green Goddess Herb Mix (sorrel, chives, mint, oregano)

  • Edible Flowers

  • 3 Seedlings of your Choice

Optional:

  • Pea Shoots

  • More radishes!

Bread: A selection from Carissa’s Bakery

Cheese: A selection from Catapano Dairy

Fruit Share: Starts in a few weeks!

Recipes:

How to Use Edible Flowers

“Green Goddess” Dressing: Our shorthand lingo for fresh dressing or aoili with whatever herbs we have on hand - you can’t go wrong! You can finely chop or food processor the herbs in your bunch and combine with olive oil, vinegar, and some salt and pepper to taste for a perky addition to this week’s baby greens, or use one of these recipes as a base: Buttermilk Green Goddess; The Kitchn

2018: Week 26 - Last Week!!

Good Morning

It’s hard to believe but the end of the CSA season has arrived. Thank you so much for joining us for our 10th season! It’s been a great one. CSA has always been a staple of this farm, and we are so glad to have grown it over the last decade and to have it remain such a steady pillar of the work we do. We couldn’t do it without you!!

Don’t forget to sign up for our Thanksgiving vegetable box and to preorder your holiday pastries! The deadline is this Friday (November 16). Sign up here and use code TG2018 to get 10% off!

Recipes:

This Week’s Box:

  • Tatsoi

  • Carrots

  • Kale

  • Radishes

  • Cauliflower

  • Brussels Sprouts

  • Japanese Sweet Potatoes

  • White Sweet Potatoes

  • Butternut Squash

  • Daikon Radishes

  • Napa Cabbage (purple or green!)- optional

  • Wheat Berries - optional

  • Parsley - optional

  • Watermelon/Black Spanish Radishes - optional

  • Spicy Salad Bouquet - optional

  • Kohlrabi - optional

  • Jalapeños - optional

Fruit:

  • Granny Smith Apples

  • Pink Lady and Cortland Apples

Cheese:

  • Mix of Mecox cheese

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Sourdough


2018: Week 25

Good Morning!

Election Day is here. GO VOTE!

The Box:

  • Garlic

  • Brussel Sprouts

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Carrots

  • Cauliflower

  • Parsley

  • Kale

  • Broccoli

  • Lettuce

  • Cabbage

  • Watermelon/Spanish Radishes - optional

  • Hakurei Turnips - optional

  • Shishitos - optional

  • Butternut Squash - optional

  • Sage - optional

Fruit:

  • Bosc Pears

  • Pink Lady Apples

Cheese:

  • Mix of Mecox and Catapano cheese

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Baguette


2018: Week 24

Good Morning and Happy Halloween!

The last week of October is looking to be a beautiful fall week. All of our garlic is in the ground, as is our wheat for next summer.

As we continue with our fall clean-up projects, we are prepping for a move of our deer fencing this winter. The deer pressure makes growing anything that isn’t a pungent allium like garlic or onions nearly impossible outside a fence. We are hoping to encompass the front pizza oven/event yard and our field to the east of that to expand our growing area. This is crucial, not just to keep out the deer, but to take care of the land. The more area we have, the more we can let fields rest after planting into and harvesting from them. This season we grew about 20 acres of crops on 15 acres of land. This is because of our many succession crops. Once we finish with a short season crop like radishes or lettuce, we quickly mow and disc the ground to prepare for fresh beds and a new crop. More land would allow us to leave those fields to rest without extra tillage and regenerate with a protective cover crop for a bit longer before they return to the production rotation.

Recipes:

The Box:

  • Kale

  • Scallions

  • Kohlrabi

  • Baby Lettuce

  • Head Lettuce

  • Carrots

  • White Radishes

  • Hakurei Turnips

  • Butternut Squash

  • Broccoli

  • Wheat Berries

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers - optional

  • Garlic - optional

  • (More) Lettuce - optional

  • Cabbage - optional

  • Sweet Potatoes - optional

Fruit:

  • Choice of various apples

Cheese:

  • Choice of Catapano and Mecox Cheeses

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Pickled Rye

2018: Week 23

Good morning -

We received the first frost last Friday, much earlier than we did last year. Ths affected some of our tender greens, flowers, and herbs. However, our root vegetables and cold weather greens and brassicas are still doing well. We are continuing to cover crop the fields, which can be a bit of a race to get seed in the ground before the true hard frost that makes the soil an inhospitable place for germination.


Recipes:

The Box:

  • Collard Greens

  • Head Lettuce

  • Baby Kale

  • Parsley

  • Scallions

  • French Breakfast Radishes

  • Hakurei Turnips

  • Potatoes from Balsam Farms

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Green Peppers

  • Cabbage - optional

  • Red Curly Kale - optional

  • Fairytale Eggplant - optional

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers - optional

  • Broccoli - optional

  • Sage - optional

Fruit:

  • Empire Apples

  • Pears

Cheese:

  • Choice of various Mecox and Silver Lake cheeses

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Baguette

Winter hardy herbs are still available in the herb garden!


2018: Week 22

Good Morning!

As the weather gets colder we continue to close down our fields for the season. We will be harvesting the last of some of our summer veggies this week, but we still have plenty of fall produce including carrots, radishes, and lots of greens. This week we received our garlic seed (which is really just individual garlic cloves!) and are hoping to start planting it the end of this week.

The colder weather is also getting us excited for Thanksgiving and we are excited to announce our Thanksgiving edition box! The vegetable box, which is intended to prepare dishes for 8 people, will include sweet potatoes, squash, potatoes, brussels sprouts, greens, and more! Sign up sheets are available in our market and on our website. In addition to the vegetable box we are also offering a variety of baked goods from our kitchen and local bakeries baked fresh just for you! Options include a variety of breakfast pastries, squash loaves, bars + cookies, dinner rolls + breads, and pie + whips. As CSA members you will receive 10% off the vegetable box and baked goods - just use the code TG2018 at checkout.

Recipes:

The Box:

  • Baby Lettuce Mix

  • Head Lettuce

  • Parsley

  • Lacinato Kale

  • Green Cabbage

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  • Delicata Squash

  • Carrots

  • Eggplant

  • Broccoli

  • Garlic - optional

  • Jalapeños - optional

  • Saute Bouquet (mix of mustards and tat soi) - optional

  • Sweet Potatoes - optional

  • Fennel - optional

Cheese:

  • Choice of various East Hill Creamery and Mecox varieties

Fruit:

  • Mutsu apples

  • Honeycrisp apples

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Baguette

Don’t forget to pick some flowers before it gets too cold! The herb garden is also still open!

2018: Week 21

Good Morning!

Thanks to those who attended the potluck this Sunday it’s been a great season sharing the farm with all of you! As we roll into fall, more and more of our fields are shrinking as we continue to prepare the land for cover crop. Walk the fields each week and you’ll begin to notice some big changes in the farm’s landscape.

The last week of the share runs until before Thanksgiving. So for the following holiday week we’re offering a special box that is double the size of your normal share and filled with things for a hearty Thanksgiving meal. Sign up sheets are available in our market and will be posted online shortly!

Recipes:

The Box:

  • Poblano Peppers

  • Tatsoi

  • Head Lettuce

  • Baby Lettuce Mix

  • Broccolini

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Delicata Squash

  • Garlic

  • Hakurei Turnips

  • Eggplant

  • Shishitos - optional

  • Kale - optional

  • Radishes - optional

  • Sorrel - optional

Cheese:

  • Choice of various Catapano and Mecox varieties

Fruit:

  • Choose 2: peaches, pears, or apples

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Honey Oat Loaf

The U-Pick fields are petering out, but there are 3 beds of fall flowers and the herb garden is still kicking. There are some peppers still out there, too, if you’re willing to do a bit of hunting!


2018: Week 20

Happy October!

For those of you who have joined us for the Columbus Day Share, this will be your last week. Thank you so much for joining us! If you’d like to extend until Thanksgiving, let us know; we’d love to have you.

The soil is still wet from the intense rains last week, keeping us out of the fields on tractors.That hasn’t stopped our crew from keeping busy on our farm, and others.

Last week our apprentices joined in for a day at Channing Daughters Winery for their mass grape harvests that will be happening over the next couple months. Unlike an annual farm, their perennial fruits are ready to harvest only once a year. We also took the crew to harvest pumpkins at Balsam Farms, another novelty harvest for us since space constraints prevent us from growing pumpkins at Amber. All the pumpkins are adorning the front of the market and for sale!

Last year, a huge field clean-up project for us was picking up the plastic mulch we use in our beds. This mulch is a primary method to combat weeds in organic farming. It also helps prevent erosion and keep soil temperatures warm. The major drawback is that it is a non-reusable product made from and non-renewable resources. Every fall, we end up spending days picking up the plastic pieces, which can be incredibly tedious and difficult after the plastic has spent months in the ground. This year, we made a transition to biodegradable plastic. Although it is an hefty monetary investment, it has us feeling better about our use of non-renewable materials, and saves us tons of time and labor in clean-up. We can simply incorporate the mulch into our soil during discing and over the winter, it will biodegrade into the soil

This Week’s Box:

  • Lettuce

  • Kale

  • Broccoli

  • Butternut Squash

  • Cabbage

  • Bell Peppers

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  • Shishito Peppers

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Garlic

  • Spicy Salad Mix - optional

  • Collard Greens - optional

  • Kohlrabi - optional

  • Fennel - optional

  • Edible Nasturtium Flowers - optional

Fruit:

  • Gala Apples

  • Bartlett Pears

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Sour Pickled Rye

Cheese:

  • Villa Mozzarella

In the Fields:

  • Herbs

  • Cherry Tomatoes

  • Shishitos

  • Husk Cherries

  • Flowers (new bed open further into the field on the left!)

2018: Week 19


Good Morning from Farm!

We’ve been busy preparing the fields for the colder months. This transformation takes just as much time in the spring as it does this time of year. Our crew spent the week taking out tomato states and drip irrigation lines from thousands of feet of beds. Once the beds are cleared, we disc the remaining plant matter into the soil and sow cover crop on top. We managed to get quite a bit sown yesterday, just in time for the rain. We are sowing oats, peas, and rye right now as cover crop, as well as our wheat for next season. This year, we harvested our rye and are recycling that seed as cover crop for this season. Having closed loop seed-saving cycles on the farm is a huge advantage. Last year, our garlic harvest was so prolific we were able to save much of our own seed. This year however, while we still produced some great garlic, we are shopping around for seed in Vermont.

Another part of preparing for fall is preserving for the winter months. Our kitchen staff has been hard at work turning our peppers into pickles and hot sauces. We’ve sent hundreds of pounds of tomatoes to processing kitchens on the North Fork to become pasta sauce, salsas, and Bloody Mary mixes. Keep your eyes peeled in the market: as it becomes ready we will be stocking the shelves with jars of it all!

Recipes this Week:

This Week’s Box:

  • Spicy Salad Bouquet

  • Lettuce

  • Sauce Tomatoes

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  • Lunchbox Peppers

  • Garlic

  • Delicata Squash

  • Sweet Potatoes

  • Sage

  • Kale - optional

  • Radishes - optional

  • Cabbage - optional

  • Cayenne Peppers - optional

  • Arugula - optional

This Week’s Fruit:

  • Yellow Peaches

  • Empire Apples

This Week’s Cheese:

  • Choice between various Catapano and Mecox

This Week’s Bread:

  • Carissa’s Sourdough

In the Fields:

  • Flowers

  • Herbs

  • Shishitos

  • Cherry Tomatoes


2018: Week 18

Good Morning!

September is moving along and another seasonal turning point, the Fall Equinox, is upon us this weekend.

This week we jumped into several large fall crop harvests including delicata squash, sorghum, and drying flowers. Now, one of our greenhouses in filled with delicata, ready to be cured for storage. Curing is the process of drying the outer layer of vegetables, sealing them so that they can be stored over time without preservation or refrigeration. In the next two weeks, we will continue with even more winter squash including the butternut and kubocha, as well as sweet potatoes.

The delicata squash now covers all the tables of one of our greenhouses and sorghum, a grain, is hanging from the ceiling. This greenhouse has gone through rounds of transformation - first as a propagation house for seedlings in the spring and early summer, a drying house for garlic and onions in late summer, and now another curing house for our fall crops. In the winter, another of our greenhouses becomes winter lodging for our chicken and duck flock!

Recipes:

This Week’s Box:

  • Baby Kale

  • Arugula

  • Cabbage

  • Bell Peppers

  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers

  • Lunchbox Peppers

  • Beefsteak Tomatoes

  • Eggplant

  • Garlic

  • Radishes

  • Lettuce - optional

  • Okra - optional

  • Poblano Peppers - optional

  • Shishito Peppers - optional

  • Hakurei Turnips - optional

  • Seconds Eggplant - optional

  • Seconds Tomatoes - optional

Cheese:

  • Choice of various Catapano Goat Cheeses

Bread:

  • Carissa’s Sourdough

Fruit:

  • Apples

  • Nectarines

In the Field:

  • Bush Beans

  • Flowers

  • Herbs

  • Cherry Tomatoes

  • Lunchbox Peppers

  • Shishito Peppers

2018: Week 17


And just like that it seems fall is here! Along with this recent cold snap so have arrived winter squash. This week you’ll find delicata squash in your box. Even though the weather may have been a brief tease, the fall crops sure aren’t. Cabbage and Buttnernut Squash have made their debut and Brussel sprouts are soon to join.


There are still tickets available for our Sunday dinner with our friends at Outstanding in the Field. They will be here for a double weekend of farm-to-table dinners. This is always a highlight of the year for us. It is one of the few times the farm and market crew enjoys an evening of wonderful food, drink, and company without having to do any of the preparation and work! If you’re not familiar with Outstanding in the Field, be sure to check out their website and story.

Recipes:

This Week’s Box:

  • Kale

  • Lettuce

  • Arugula

  • Shishito Peppers

  • Mixed Sweet Peppers

  • Beefsteak Tomatoes

  • Sauce Tomatoes

  • Hakurei Turnips

  • Delicata Squash

  • Garlic

  • Herbs (Parsley, Rosemary, Basil)

  • Radishes - optional

  • Hot Peppers - optional

  • More Shishitos - optional

  • Fairytale Eggplant - optional

  • Italian Eggplant - optional

  • Spicy Salad - optional

  • “Seconds” Tomatoes - optional

Fruit:

  • Asian Pears

  • Green Gauge Plums

Cheese:

  • Mozzarella

Loaf:

  • Carissa’s Pickled Rye

In the Field:

  • Flowers

  • Herbs

  • Cherry Tomatoes

  • Lunchbox Peppers

  • Shishito Peppers


2018: Week 16

CSA WEEK 16

Happy September and Happy Tumbleweed Tuesday! Thank you for sticking with us through the Fall. Our CSA has dropped by more than half in member numbers. And while this means relief from the enormous harvests, it doesn’t mean any less bounty. Some of our favorite vegetables arrive in the Fall: cabbage, winter squash, carrots, turnips and other roots.

Don’t be fooled by the look of the Jimmy Nardello Peppers, one of our favorite peppers. The Jimmies are the long red peppers in your box. They are very sweet: enjoy them raw, roast them, pickle them, or slice them in half and grill them.

One of our go-o recipes from our dear friend Eileen is Oven Roasted San Marzano Tomatoes. Our favorite way to prepare them is to cut them in half and lay them on a baking sheet, cut side up. Drizzle with salt, pepper, olive oil, chopped garlic, thyme, and oregano to taste, and slow cook them at 250 for about 2 hours. They’re great eaten like that or put them in blender or food processor and turn it into sauce! (no boiling necessary!)

This Week’s Box:

  • Sauce Tomatoes
  • Beefsteak Tomatoes
  • Shishito Peppers
  • Eggplant
  • Jimmy Nardello Peppers
  • Arugula
  • Radishes
  • Onion
  • Lettuce
  • Garlic - optional
  • Spicy Salad Satuee Bouquet - optional
  • Fairytale Eggplant - optional
  • Hot Peppers- optional
  • Bagged “Seconds” Tomatoes -optional
  • Unlimited Shishitos - optional

This Week’s Cheese:

Choice of Lively Run Dairy Varieties

This Week’s Fruit:

  • Apples
  • Pears

This Week’s Loaf:

  • Carissa’s Sourdough

In the Fields:

  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Husk Cherries
  • Tomatillos
  • Lunchbox Peppers
  • Shishito Peppers
  • Herbs Flowers
  • Raspberries (some are coming back!)

2018: Week 15

Good Morning!

For those of you with the shares that run until Labor Day, this will be your last pick up. Thank you so much for sharing the season with us! Labor Day always marks a major shift, and not just because we live and farm in such a seasonal destination. This time of year, we begin our practices of covercropping for the winter months. These crops include things like oats, rye, peas, and vetch. Some of these crops die over the winter, known as winter-kill crops. These crops protect our soil from erosion and add organic matter back into land for next season’s growth.

Of our five tomato rounds, our first round has retired. The cyclical nature of farming has allowed us to abandon these plants to feed our soil -- and our chickens! We will be moving them over land that was once tomatoes to help us till and incorporate the matter into the soil. This will also provide fresh new ground and food for the chickens to enjoy, and to fertilize for us as they work their own cycles.

This Week’s Share:

  • Arugula
  • Kale
  • Beefsteak Tomatoes
  • Heirloom Tomatoes
  • Sweet Pepper Pack
  • Shishito Peppers
  • Garlic
  • Fairytale Eggplant
  • Radishes
  • Okra - optional
  • Lettuce - optional
  • Eggplant - optional
  • Hakurei Turnips - optional
  • Hot Peppers - optional
  • “Seconds” Tomatoes - optional

Recipes for the box:

This Week’s Fruit:

  • Nectarines
  • Donut Peaches

This Week’s Bread:

  • Carissa’s Sour Pickled Rye

This Week’s Cheese (choice between):

  • Mecox Sigit
  • Mecox Farmhouse Cheddar
  • Mecox Sunrise

In the Fields:

  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Husk Cherries
  • Tomatillos
  • Shishitos
  • Mini Bell Peppers
  • Flowers
  • Herbs

2018: Week 14

Good Morning from the Farm!

August may be winding down, but the fields are still going strong. As we’ve mentioned before, much of our summer crew is made up of transient young folks who join us during breaks from college. They are trickling back to school and our crew is back to our core apprentices and farmers. With the heat, humidity, and tomato plants that just won’t quit, it makes for a lot of hard work for our crew. This is the constant struggle for farmers -- the most bountiful time of year can be the most tiresome!

This week’s box is heavy on eggplant -- a great vegetable that we find tends to be highly underrated. Many people get stuck in the eggplant parm rut, but simply grilling it can be a great way to enjoy. The eggplant has a great flavor of its own: thinly slice it and lightly dress with olive oil, salt and pepper, and grill. Voila! 

The salsa pack includes everything you need for a quick salsa verde! Follow either of these recipes for Salsa Verde 

With all the tomatoes in the box and the unlimited “seconds” Rataouille is always a great option as is tomato sauce for the fall and winter months.

Jalapeno Poppers are a great way to use these spicy peppers. Try this simple recipe, or another that is a bit doctored up

This Week’s Share:

  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Shishitos
  • Green Peppers
  • Eggplant
  • Sungolds
  • Beefsteak Tomatoes
  • Heirloom Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Salsa Verde Pack (tomatillos, red onion, gypsy pepper, jalapeno)
  • Jalapenos - optional
  • Bunched Greens (arugula or spicy salad) - optional
  • Radishes - optional
  • Fairytale Eggplant - optional

Rotating Fruit:

  • Apples
  • Beach Plums

Rotating Cheese:

  • Catapano Goat Cheese

Rotating Bread:

  • Carissa’s Honey Oat Loaf

In the Field:

  • Husk Cherries
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Shishito Peppers
  • Herbs
  • Flowers

2018: Week 13

Hello from the Farm -

With the peak of tomatoes arrive the mozzarella, the basil and… the Basil Downy Mildew. Every year, farmers in the region are hit by the notorious Basil Downy Mildew, or BDM. This disease spreads rampantly and travels with weather and wind patterns. We receive alerts from farmers north and west of us that notify us of their basil status. When the BDM has struck in Massachusetts, we know it only a couple weeks away from arriving on Eastern Long Island. The disease causes discoloration of the leaves that can often be initially mistaken for nutrient deficiency, followed by a dark gray growth on the underside of the leaves.

This year we tested a new variety of basil touted to be BDM resistant, and while it has allowed us to elongate our season, it’s not foolproof. Home gardeners are often lucky to escape the BDM, since it spreads upon large quantities of crops, so your isolated pot of basil on the patio may make it through the summer just fine.

For this reason, basil is optional this week, it is totally edible and mildly affected, but within the next week or so, the mildew will overtake our plants and we will rush to glean what we can and churn out as much pesto as possible!

    This Week’s Box:

    • Heirloom Tomato Boat
    • Beefsteak Tomatoes
    • Bunched Arugula
    • Shishito Peppers
    • Fairytale Eggplant
    • Green Peppers
    • Sungold Cherry
    • Zucchini
    • Garlic
    • Okra - optional
    • Eggplant - optional
    • Tomatillos - optional
    • Basil - optional
    • “Seconds” Tomatoes - optional

    Recipe Suggestions:

    • Use your arugula and grab some optional tomatillos in a Green Harissa used as a sauce, marinade, or spread. Substitute the jalapeno with the highlander pepper in the box (the small, lime one) for a milder version.
    • This recipe for an Arugula Gimlet makes for a refreshing summer cocktail.
    • If you don’t opt to eat all your tomatoes raw, this Tomato and Roasted Garlic Pie is a great way to use all your tomatoes. There are also extra “seconds” available to take on the optional table this week.
    • Grab some optional basil and use the zucchini in your box for a Summer Squash and Basil Pasta

    This Week’s Fruit:

    • Blackberries
    • Peaches

    This Week’s Cheese:

    • Mozzarella

    This Week’s Bread:

    • Carissa’s Sourdough

    In the Fields:

    • Sungold tomatoes
    • Husk Cherries
    • Shishito Peppers
    • Raspberries (If you can spot any. They will make a second appearance in the Fall if we are lucky)
    • Herbs
    • Flowers

    CSA Week 12

    Good Morning!

    The core farm crew every year is made up of our apprentices. This year we have four apprentices (check out this year’s crew) who joined us in early April and will be with us until the end of October.

    As we’ve mentioned before, they are an integral part of the farm’s function and mission. As farmers in training, they are part of an educational program comprised of boots on the ground work as well as lessons and lectures from the farmers on staff. We’ve developed our own curriculum for the apprenticeship pulling from the staples of organic farming, other farming educational programs around the country and have tailored it to our unique geography and farming model. 

    A highlight of the summer is the Northeast Organic Farming Association’s annual conference. Our apprentices will be traveling to Amherst, MA this weekend for three days filled with farming lectures and workshops with other farmers from around the Northeast. They will return with new knowledge, tips and tricks that we hopefully we can incorporate into the remainder of the summer and seasons beyond!

    For recipes this week...

    If you want to enjoy your Sungolds another way besides snacking on them raw, here is a Sungold Vinaigrette recipe

    It’s summer and corn is here! Perfect Grilled Corn on the Cob

    Blistered Shishito Peppers (do the same with the optional Padrons if you choose those!)

    This Week’s Box:

    • Tomatoes
    • Sungold Cherry Tomatoes
    • Kale
    • Salsa Pack (onion, tomatillos, tomatoes, garlic, bell pepper, and jalapeno)
    • Corn (from our friends at Balsam Farms)
    • Basil
    • Shishito Peppers
    • Mint - optional
    • Padron Peppers - optional (these are the “west coast version” of shishitos and they are quite spicier!)
    • Zucchini - optional
    • Eggplant - optional

    Fruit:

    • Donut Peaches
    • Yellow Peaches

    Rotating Bread:

    • Carissa’s Honey Oat Loaf

    Rotating Cheese:

    • Mecox Atlantic Mist

    In the Fields:

    • Sungold tomatoes
    • Husk Cherries
    • Raspberries (If you can spot any. They will make a second appearance in the Fall if we are lucky)
    • Herbs
    • Flowers